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Abolition of the transfer Master's programme (doorstroommaster)

 

Abolition of the transfer Master's programme is consistent with a mature Bachelor-Master system.
By abolishing the transfer Master's programme, the universities can give their Master's programmes a more distinct character. As admission is no longer granted automatically, selection of all students for all Master's programmes is now possible. As a result, students can make more carefully considered choices about which Master's programme to take. This is consistent with a mature Bachelor-Master system in which the Bachelor's and Master's programmes are separate entities.  However, the principle is still that Bachelor's graduates will always have the opportunity to take a Master's programme. In order to guarantee this, a ministerial privilege has been included, namely that the minister can determine that one or more institution boards, for Bachelor's programmes determined by the minister, must designate at least one Master's programme to which the graduates of this Bachelor's programme are immediately admitted.

By abolishing the transfer Master's programme, Master's programmes can be given a more distinct character in order to attract a specific group of Master's students. This will contribute to a more differentiated and distinctive offering of Master's programmes, in line with the Veerman committee's recommendations. These fairer requirements also mean that more students from other Bachelor's programmes will have the chance of being admitted to the Master's programme of their choice. Moreover, this brings the Netherlands into line with the rest of Europe, which has largely scrapped transfer Master's programmes since the adoption of the Bachelor-Master system in Bologna. However, the universities still retain the possibility to maintain their transfer Master's programme.

 


Sources
Wetsvoorstel Kwaliteit in Verscheidenheid hoger onderwijs - Kamerstuk 33519 – 23-01-2013